Topic Thread

Expand all | Collapse all

Highway Destress

  • 1.  Highway Destress

    Posted 03-20-2017 11:58 AM
    Hello Every One!

    The Picture attached shows the distress occurred in the pavement constructed using cobble stone for the Collector Road.

    As seen the distress was occurred along the  line having 1 meter from the edge of the carriageway.

    Please Any one identify the cause and reason for such failure.

    Thank You

    ------------------------------
    Kiran Kumar D P Aff.M.ASCE
    Bangalore
    919663 742414
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-21-2017 01:25 PM
    These photos clearly show sign of rutting. One meter from the edge corresponds to  wheel path. The cause base/subbase/subgrade failure. Needs full depth replacement.

    ------------------------------
    Dincer Egin Ph.D., P.E., P.G., D.GE, CEG, M.ASCE
    Vice President
    The Louis Berger Group, Inc
    Whippany NJ
    (973) 407-1375
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-22-2017 12:10 PM
    Hello!

    I appreciate for your valuable reply.

    Thank You

    ------------------------------
    Kiran Kumar D P Aff.M.ASCE
    Lecturer
    Bangalore
    919663 742414
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-23-2017 11:32 AM
    It would be nice to know something about the plasticity index of the soil.  I suspect the railroad had a barrow ditch to carry off water and that it  was filled in (poorly) to construct the road.  The problem is that Mother Nature always remembers where the water ran and will continue to flow there unless intercepted and redirected.  Look for the solution to your problem "off site".  I have run into this sort of problem on numerous occasions.

    ------------------------------
    James Anderson P.E., M.ASCE
    Consulting Engineer
    North Richland Hills TX
    (817) 485-6408
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-21-2017 01:25 PM
    Can the line of failure be caused by differences in the compaction of the soils beneath the railroad track and the adjacent road?  I have observed similar lines of distress in roads placed over old railroad tracks.

    ------------------------------
    Ed Fischer M.ASCE
    Hydrologist (retired)
    Iowa City IA

    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-21-2017 01:26 PM
    Hi Kiran!

    What type/size of vehicles are using this collector roadway? Also, do you have any details regarding the subgrade material and/or the structural section supporting the cobbles?

    ------------------------------
    Benjamin Jensen P.E., M.ASCE
    SENIOR TRANSP ENGINEER
    Wallace Group
    San Luis Obispo CA
    (805)544-4011 EXT 124
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-22-2017 12:11 PM
    Hello!

    Usually the light vehicles.

    Thank YOU

    ------------------------------
    Kiran Kumar D P Aff.M.ASCE
    Lecturer
    Bangalore
    919663 742414
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-21-2017 01:27 PM
    Evidence of a sub grade failure.  Check to see if there are underground utilities possibly a water leak.  Does your climate have freeze - thaw?  If so, I suspect water in the sub grade that froze and then thawed probably several times.  In any case, excavate along the CL of the failure + 1/2 meter either side.  Backfill with select fill and compact and replace the  cobblestones.  Be careful of both the backfill materials and the compaction.  

    ------------------------------
    Michael Ellegood P.E., M.ASCE
    Consultant
    Prescott AZ
    (602) 468-3142
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-22-2017 12:11 PM
    Hello!

    I appreciate for your valuable reply. THERE IS NO SUCH UTILITIES FOUND BENEATH THE CARRIAGEWAY

    Thank You

    ------------------------------
    Kiran Kumar D P Aff.M.ASCE
    Lecturer
    Bangalore
    919663 742414
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-21-2017 01:27 PM
    Agree with others commenting that a subgrade failure from loads applied in excess of design capability and/or subgrade penetrated by water from unidentified sources.

    ------------------------------
    Keith Wetsell P.E., M.ASCE
    General Manager
    Razorback Concrete Co
    West Memphis AR
    (870) 735-9580
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-22-2017 12:12 PM
    Combination of rotational failures between both wheel paths.  You need to take out the entire lane width down to about 2 feet, depending on what a geotechnical or soils engineer onsite says, to be sure.  Is there a waterline parallel with the road?  If so and it was backfilled with muck you might be able to get away with just replacing that material, but if it was the material from the excavation itself, indications are you should replace the whole lane width anyway.  With a good mixer and some cheap Type C fly ash you might be able to go down a foot or so, all depending on what's doing that.  I'd do it in the dry season though, looks like the other side is about to go too.  You might want to do the other side while you're in there anyway.  That's what it looks like from here.  Let us know what you do and how it works out please.

    ------------------------------
    Stephen Hemphill P.E., M.ASCE
    Semi-Retired
    Rio Rancho NM
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-22-2017 12:14 PM
    Kiran,

    I don't have much professional experience in this area yet, but to me it looks like the effects of thermal expansion. Looking at the photos, the wheel path appears to straddle the line of cobblestone that heaved. The lack of compaction by traffic between the two wheel paths and the presence of excessive heat, that I'm sure is present in India (assuming that's where this is located), could easily cause this sort of heaving in any paved surface. I don't agree with any of the "freeze/thaw" comments, as this is obviously not that sort of region, judging by the photos. I think simply removing the displaced stone and replacing would solve the problem without much subgrade work. You may want to consider organizing the stone with larger gaps or have a fine sandy filler between the stones that will allow them to move laterally without being displaced.

    ------------------------------
    Ryan Hendriks A.M.ASCE
    Pipeline Integrity Engineer
    Lake Superior Consulting
    Bloomington MN
    (612)328-9283
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-23-2017 11:36 AM
    I agree that the failure pattern is highly suggestive of subgrade shear failure, as there are clear signs of both rutting along the wheel paths and heaving in the area between the wheel paths. I don't find the idea of heave due to thermal expansion very convincing, since it doesn't explain the rutting aspect. Another thing that is important to note is that the photographs seem to show that the problem his relatively localized. That suggests a subgrade anomaly, caused either by poor quality soils, inadequate subgrade preparation or poor subsurface drainage. Although some of the previously suggested repairs appear to be on the right track, we're all shooting in the dark unless we find out what the subgrade conditions are. I suggest doing some hand-auger borings to check subgrade soil and groundwater conditions. Then, select an appropriate repair based on the conditions encountered.

    ------------------------------
    Fernando Souto P.E., M.ASCE
    Senior Project Manager
    Cadillac MI
    (231)944-5145
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-24-2017 11:09 AM
    Fernando has the right answer - we can hypothesize all we want, but unless we know more about the situation we are indeed just "shooting in the dark".  How long have the cobblestones been there?  What are the soils?  Is there a leach field there?  Standing water after rain?  It appears there is some construction or material storage off to the right side of the first picture, could it be a result of heavy turning traffic there?  You say usually just light traffic, but this appears to be the result of heavier traffic.  It could be localized, but if the cobblestone was just recently placed there appears to be evidence of potential failure coming up.  Definitely subgrade though.  What's the big picture?  Can you give a Google Earth link or lat-long or something?  Interesting though.  

    ------------------------------
    Stephen Hemphill P.E., M.ASCE
    Semi-Retired
    Rio Rancho NM
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-23-2017 02:45 PM
    Does this asphalt pavement deformation appear to be similar? Subgrade issues.Severe rutting, heaving.

    ------------------------------
    William Norman P.E., M.ASCE
    Structural Engineer
    Keeler-Webb Associates
    Carmel IN
    (317) 650-3815
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 03-25-2017 12:04 PM
    I do not know pavement structure? How old is pavement?

    Cobble stone pavement placed in flat profile. Pavement is very permeable and will saturate aggregate base, subgrade..). Drainage is big issue on this project very flat and boxed in. Subgrade failure might be the cause of 
    cobble stones dislodging and rutting occurred on wheel paths and cobble stone between got shoved.

    i believe site investigation remove cobble stone will reveal pavement structure (BASE, SUBGRADE), if rutting occurred in subgrade or base and may be perform DCP and I will do same thing on section that is performing very well for comparison.

    Corrective action: undercut (use geotextile fabric, #57 aggregate or similar and choke it with aggregate base 1" minus or similar) and day lighted. Preventive maintenance it looks like there is no clearance issue to  raise grade, may be place 2 layers of asphalt (one leveling course and one surface course with 2% and crown in middle to shed water).

    Thanks for the opportunity to comment.


    ------------------------------
    Mourad Bouhajja P.E., M.ASCE
    Marketing/Technical Manager
    Oldcastle Materials
    Midlothian, VA
    (804) 516-3804
    ------------------------------



  • 17.  RE: Highway Destress

    Posted 10-23-2017 09:44 AM
      |   view attached
    These are the gradations to be followed in INDIA for GSB layer. Still the roads here are failing after monsoon rains and the failure is suspected to be that caused by GSB layer. I feel these gradations have a role in this failure can someone please check it and confirm

    ------------------------------
    Rahul Sreedhar S.M.ASCE
    India
    ------------------------------