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Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

  • 1.  Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-18-2020 05:21 PM
    Dear friends a question has been on my mind for some time.
    If a challenge is raised on the ASCE collaborate site and at the same time the same challenge is raised as a post on LinkedIn.
    We will see that the contributors to that post on LinkedIn are much more than the ASCE Collaborate site.
    I looked a little closer and realized that most of the participants are also members of ASCE.
    What do you think is the reason?
    What should we do if we, as members of ASCE, intend to use this site as a reference for other engineers?
    How can we introduce ASCE more to the engineering community?

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    Reza Mokarramaydenlou, Ph.D., C.Eng, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE
    Structural Engineering and Seismic rehabilitation Consultant
    Author of the book in Elsevier
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-20-2020 03:38 PM
    Collaborate is a growing platform.  As a leader of my local section, I am promoting it's use among our membership.

    Today we hosted a section event which incorporated elements of the Collaborate and it is now memorialized here:

    https://collaborate.asce.org/blogs/chad-morrison1/2020/10/20/critical-thinking-in-construction

    Events created in Collaborate can be shared via facebook & linkedin.  The permalink above can be shared freely across all platforms.

    Why should engineers choose Collaborate over Linkedin?

    - It is a member benefit (parts are viewable to the public during the pandemic)

    - users on collaborate are ASCE members in good standing

    - posts are moderated by peers and reviewed as needed by an editorial board to maintain the code of conduct

    - features such as direct mail with other members, event landing pages, blogs, libraries, and calendars - It is a hub for ASCE activity

    - building your network, being an ASCE member is just the starting point of what you have in common with another user

    To give a fair shake to Linkedin

    Why should engineers choose Linkedin over Collaborate?

    - to actively or passively job search or recruit

    - to reach others who are in related industries or professions

    Share your Collaborate content on Linkedin.  Those who click on it will be able to: view it, login and view it, or encounter a restricted access message.  The solution to removing the restricted access is becoming an active member of ASCE.  Hopefully, that encourages membership, rather than stifling it... but it is up to us as users to make the content appealing so that it is encouraging!  Making Collaborate more visible on Linkedin will encourage users to participate.  Collaborate is a vibrant and diverse platform, if it continues to be a welcoming community with a trusted knowledge base, it will continue to grow.  We all share that responsibility as users.





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    Chad Morrison P.E., M.ASCE
    Professional Engineer
    Greenville RI
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  • 3.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-20-2020 06:10 PM
    Dear Chad Morrison,
    You mentioned good points.
    We can use the capabilities of both as a synergy.
    The important question is, as you are aware, the process of providing content on LinkedIn is different from that of Collaborate?
    How can we reach a subscription to make the LinkedIn audience more attractive and eager to join the ASCE Collaborate?

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    Reza Mokarramaydenlou, Ph.D., C.Eng, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE
    Structural Engineering and Seismic rehabilitation Consultant
    Author of the book in Elsevier
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-21-2020 09:35 AM
    Trusted members and moderated content.  The alternative is engtips.com which does not have these things.  Of course as you see in the ethics discussion, the option to post anonymously does have its place.  We do know the post is being made by an ASCE member, which is a meaningful credential.

    Collaborate is FREE with ASCE membership.  So it should not be seen as a subscription, but one benefit among many.  Emphasizing free is probably a great start!

    Collaborate has far more viewers than posters and that is to be expected.  One of the best ways to engage others to post for the first time is to ask technical questions.

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    Chad Morrison P.E., M.ASCE
    Professional Engineer
    Greenville RI
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  • 5.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-21-2020 10:09 AM
    If I understand correctly, you mean that the ASCE Collaborate should be a platform for expressing technical challenges in order to attract more audiences. Did I get it right?

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    Reza Mokarramaydenlou, Ph.D., C.Eng, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE
    Structural Engineering and Seismic rehabilitation Consultant
    Author of the book in Elsevier
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-21-2020 11:42 AM
    Technical topics tend to draw first time contributors.  We also want to be a resource for soft skills, professional development, and career development. Understanding, of course that such posts (like any other social media outlet) are widely circulated and talking about one's career path and experience (including my own) requires some discretion.  Hence, hesitation on posting on such topics is common.  Posts related to specific projects and human resources can have legal implications for the practicing professional.  Therefore, the expectation is on professionals to follow the Collaborate Code of Conduct and ASCE Code of Ethics, with moderators and the editorial board only jumping in as needed to direct the discussion.  This is not something that is expected on Linkedin.

    So in my most recent post, which I will promote here:

    https://collaborate.asce.org/integratedstructures/communities/community-home/digestviewer/viewthread?MessageKey=ad277bca-fcd4-4661-ae6d-f537547bb6fe&CommunityKey=6d0d80c2-458a-49ad-aa81-212c38ccf106&tab=digestviewer#bmad277bca-fcd4-4661-ae6d-f537547bb6fe

    where I ask about touching up anodized aluminum.  As my expertise is in steel, my AISC resources don't seem to cover this topic, and my aluminum books on my desk don't have the answer, I am seeking knowledge from others who may have encountered this condition.  This question is not related to a specific project, nor career oriented.  Therefore, there is little risk for an engineer to offer guidance or a resource in answering the question.

    Collaborate is a place for professional discourse and career guidance and users should strive to make it a comfortable environment for all.  With that said, many professional engineers choose to view rather than participate to avoid issues with contracts, litigation, employment, or ownership of work.  Working for a contractor, I cannot claim full ownership of designs.  I find it best to discuss past projects rather than present ones (even though those are probably my most pressing questions at the moment).  Demonstrating professional discourse on hot button issues (such as climate change) is certainly another way to elevate and attract users from Linkedin, you don't have to look far to see where those conversations end up on there.

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    Chad Morrison P.E., M.ASCE
    Professional Engineer
    Greenville RI
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  • 7.  RE: Linkedin or Asce collaborate, which of them is better for ASCE member ?

    Posted 10-21-2020 02:20 PM
    Dear Chad,

    The explanation was great, I suggest other members read this. I also request that you inform the other members of ASCE collaborate about your achievements in this field.

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    Reza Mokarramaydenlou Ph.D., C.Eng, P.E., S.E., M.ASCE
    Structural Engineering and Seismic rehabilitation Consultant
    Author of the book in Elsevier
    ------------------------------