Integrated Buildings & Structures

  • 1.  STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-08-2019 12:10 PM

    Recently while browsing a traveling magazine I stumble into an image of a clear detail of STONE corbeling done centuries ago at a 9th Century Hindu Temple in Indonesia. Somewhat similar to a recent brick corbeling model that I build at my backyard deck this past year while experimenting with Parabolic Brick Corbeling Arch construction modeling. It is amazing to see how old we could find traces of stone corbeling arch construction somewhere around the world. "Learning from the past to build for the future."

    Perhaps Engineering Schools could start promoting more of a hands-on nano scale experimental construction of building models to validate some basic concepts of stability and principles of static equilibrium and basic graphical models of structures in 2D and 3D with all different type of materials, not just steel and concrete .... . Kind of going from the digital world to the actual world by hands.

    "Learning by Doing." It is just about time for Engineering Schools to diversify and broaden the spectrum of new materials in a new age of new technologies, robotics, 3D printing, etc. What are the actual physical properties of 3D printed materials .... Time to adapt to new technologies!

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/131026670389472993

    Stone CorbelingParabolic Brick Arch



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    Pedro Munoz Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE
    Principal
    PRM Engineering, LLC
    Methuen MA
    (978)7388001
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  • 2.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-09-2019 12:15 PM
    Pedro, I agree 100% with you. Once the fundamentals up to and including principles of structural analysis & design are completed, I think that a hands on learning by doing would only strengthen some of the fundamental principles and most likely broaden their design base.

    All too often I come across engineers who have no understanding of real world issues and or construction techniques, but they sure can recite every inch of the building code.

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    Erik Gibbs P.E., M.ASCE
    South County Engineering
    San Juan Capistrano CA
    (949)310-7329
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  • 3.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-10-2019 10:04 AM
    Dr. Munoz,
    Thank you for shedding light on this ancient construction technique.
    I can foresee an important and interesting course work for future Architects and/or Structural Engineering students on evolution of modern architecture and engineering principles based on method and techniques followed in earlier civilization.

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    Gautam Ghosh P.E., M.ASCE
    owner
    G S Realty
    Tampa FL
    (813)929-4732
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  • 4.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-11-2019 09:49 AM
    Dear Erik and Gautam,
    It is very encouraging to listen to positive feedback on this subject of "Learning from the Past" and "Building New Technologies"  experimenting "By Doing" with our own hands. So much can be learned going from the digital model to the actual building a real structure, and IF it is done by a team of students, then several other aspects of design can be put in practice, coordination, leadership, collaboration, delegation, implementation, measuring, cutting, assembling, etc. ..... Just in the past few months that I have been experimenting on my own building small scale (nano scale) models with different materials, balsa wood, timber, steel, plastic, cardboard, flexible corrugated plastic, etc. came to realize how important is "Teamwork" ... Going from the digital model to reality is a big challenge, sometimes the initial ideas to build up are not always the best and one have to adapt and modify to get the best results, but "We Learn By Doing." I will show later in other posts some of my own nano scale models to encourage students and designers to try building small scale models or have them 3D printed if it may be more appropriate. Let's motivate and inspire the new generation of students to try to recreate what is done with the 3D software with actual small scale models and materials ... to get a real feeling of how lines, arcs, and angles, all come together ... perhaps along the way we may have to make adjustments or modify the initial designs, but that is what we "Learn by Doing".

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    Pedro Munoz Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE
    Principal
    PRM Engineering, LLC
    Methuen MA
    (978)7388001
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-12-2019 10:00 AM
    Please consider my lecture series "Understanding the World's Greatest Structures," produced by The Great Courses.  In this course, I discuss great bridges, buildings and towers from antiquity to the present day, using over 100 physical models and demonstrations to illustrate key structural engineering concepts.

    In this course, you'll learn (for example) that Mycenaean Greeks were constructing monumental stone corbelled arches around 1250 B.C.

    Understanding the World's Greatest Structures: Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity
    English remove preview
    Understanding the World's Greatest Structures: Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity
    Experience the engineering genius that makes works such as the Giza pyramids, Brunelleschi's dome, and the Brooklyn Bridge possible with Understanding the World's Greatest Structures: Science and Innovation from Antiquity to Modernity. Delivered by award-winning Professor Stephen Ressler, these 24 lectures take you on a richly illustrated tour that deftly blends history and science to create an unforgettable survey of our world's most remarkable structural masterpieces.
    View this on English >
    https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/understanding-the-world-s-greatest-structures-science-and-innovation-from-antiquity-to-modernity.html




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    Stephen Ressler Ph.D., P.E., Dist.M.ASCE, F.ASEE
    Education Consultant
    Bethlehem PA
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  • 6.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-15-2019 12:49 PM
    Dear Dr. Ressler,

    Absolutely enlightening and excellently presented Videos! FORM --> FUNCTION --> FORCES .... It really takes the viewer into the actual structures and one can feel very closely your well presented demonstrations of the models. Certainly this type of visual learning will inspire architectural and engineering students into building hands-on physical models to get a real experience of form, forces, and function. Great Work!!!

     Brooklyn Bridge | History of Architectural Design | World's Greatest Structures
    YouTube remove preview
    Brooklyn Bridge | History of Architectural Design | World's Greatest Structures
    Your world is filled with structures that have stood the test of time. That give character to the cities and landscapes in which they're located. That are visited by millions of people each year. And that capture our wonder for the marvels of engineering innovation and progress.
    View this on YouTube >



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    Pedro Munoz Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE
    Principal
    PRM Engineering, LLC
    Methuen MA
    (978)7388001
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-17-2019 05:54 PM
    Greetings to everyone! I agree with you. As an example, I invited my students from Strength of materials class to prepare several structures using plastic bottles and lacings as structural bricks and steel. They learned that the shape is important also, not just strength.




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    Andres Guzman Ing., M.ASCE
    PROFESSOR
    UNIVERSIDAD DEL NORTE
    Barranquilla
    573004284680
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  • 8.  RE: STONE CORBELING FROM 9TH CENTURY

    Posted 01-18-2019 10:06 AM
    GREAT! Congratulations ..... Keep Going and let your students come up with any meaningful ideas of more innovative projects, that at the same time teach themselves about Statics, Strength of Materials, Stability, and Structural Forms, also opens the doors to ADAPTIVE and SUSTAINABLE applications for the community. There are so many discarded materials out there that can be reused or used appropriately. Go for it! "Esto me recuerda la malla de gallinero del patio de mi casa ... que veo tambien pueda ser utilizada como malla de refuerzo arriba y abajo de las botellas de plastico ....." Very clever idea of filling the bottles with sand, it looks like it .... and the lacing reinforces the concept of "STRUT AND TIE" .... a concept that has not been widely used today but that could prove very important to analyze out of the box unusual structural configurations, Look at the ACI 318-14 "Strut and Tie Method" .... and try to have your students to explore it a bit more on a practical way? Try on using a Parabolic Curve for the Arch, which by nature tends to be more of a funicular form that direct the loads more toward the center line of the arch. "Learn by Doing" ..... FORM --> FUNCTION --> FORCES, Kudos! I am sure there will be plenty of innovative applications of these sustainable, creative, and readaptable systems for the environment, infrastructure, geotechnical, roads, culverts, short span bridges, and slope stability projects among so many that come to mind. Next time, try using a plywood formwork of a parabolic shape and you will see the amazing increase of strength of the funicular arch, for that you may need to use some type of horizontal restraints at both ends of the parabolic arch at ground level.

    Stay tinned for a graphical method to easily draw a parabolic curve right on top of the piece of the plywood with just a pencil, measuring tape or ruler, and a straight edge, and the basic triangular dimensions of the base and height to create the parabolic curve. Perhaps you may had already seen this graphical method in the books: "Shaping Structures-Statics" and "Form and Forces-Designing Efficient Expressive Structures" of Waclaw Zalewski and Edward Allen from Wiley and Sons. Check them out!  They have plenty of Graphical Methods and great illustrations of very creative and practical structural forms.

    It will be very interesting to see what any other group of architectural and engineering students are similarly doing?

    Great Work!

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    Pedro Munoz Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE
    Principal
    PRM Engineering, LLC
    Methuen MA
    (978)7388001
    ------------------------------