ABET Civil Engineering Program Criteria Draft

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_6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

  • 1.  _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 04-28-2021 04:24 PM

    CURRENT CRITERIA

    PROPOSED CRITERIA

    RATIONALE FOR CHANGE


     

    apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and numerical methods to solve civil engineering problems;

    • Engineering mechanics, materials science, and numerical methods are explicitly cited in the CEBOK3, which specifies that concepts and principles in these areas be applied in the context of CE problem-solving.
    • The CEBOK3 specifies "solid and fluid mechanics;" however, "engineering mechanics" is used in the proposed CEPC to allow for more flexibility.


  • 2.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-16-2021 04:49 PM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 1:  Why was "materials science" added?

    RESPONSE (as a CEPC Task Committee member):  Neither the ABET general criteria nor the current Civil Engineering program criteria specify "materials science."  Curricular content related to materials science can count towards satisfying part of General Criterion 3 and General Criterion 5, but materials science is not addressed specifically in the ABET accreditation criteria. Recognizing the importance of knowledge of materials science and its use in all realms of civil engineering, the CEBOK3 included "materials science" as one of four "engineering fundamentals" outcomes (others are engineering mechanics, experiment methods & data analysis, critical thinking & problem solving). 



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-24-2021 12:51 PM
    To reiterate an issue brought up in NCEDHC, "material science" has a very specific meaning to many in the broader engineering world.  I think this is easily misunderstood as requiring coverage phase diagrams . . .

    ------------------------------
    William Kitch Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE
    Angelo State University
    San Angelo TX
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-16-2021 04:50 PM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 2:  How can a program implement the "materials science" requirement?

    RESPONSE (as a CEPC Task Committee member):  The inclusion of "apply concepts and principles of … materials science … to solve civil engineering problems" is intended to ensure that concepts and principles of materials science and their application in civil engineering are addressed in the curriculum.  It is not required that a separate course in materials (e.g., materials science, engineering materials, materials selection) be included in the curriculum. Some programs may want to include a separate course in their curriculum and use the course to help fulfill basic science requirements.  Other programs may choose to incorporate concepts and principles of materials science in one or more courses with different foci (e.g., solid mechanics, soil mechanics, steel design, water treatment).  It is recognized that "materials science" is a very broad field of science and can be interpreted very differently in different contexts.  Programs have flexibility in deciding which concepts and principles of materials science to address in their curriculum.  A final note:  this is only a requirement for the inclusion of materials science in the curriculum; there is no requirement for a program to assess students' ability to apply materials science concepts.



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 5.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-27-2021 10:51 AM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 3:  Why was "engineering mechanics" added?

    RESPONSE:  Neither the ABET general criteria nor the current Civil Engineering program criteria specify "engineering mechanics."  Recognizing the importance of knowledge of mechanics in all realms of civil engineering, the CEBOK3 included "engineering mechanics" as one of four "engineering fundamentals" outcomes (others are materials science, experiment methods & data analysis, critical thinking & problem solving).  Inclusion of "engineering mechanics" in the curriculum is necessary to enable the students to solve complex problems in various disciplines of civil engineering.  The CEBOK3 also specifically calls for application of the concepts and principles of solid and fluid mechanics.  In the context of a traditional civil engineering curriculum, it is hard to argue against the inclusion of solid mechanics and fluid mechanics.  However, the CEPC Task Committee viewed specification of these particular topics as overly prescriptive.  The Task Committee thus has proposed to include the more general term "engineering mechanics" which provides more flexibility and meets the intent of the CEBOK3.



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-27-2021 10:52 AM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 4:  How can a program implement the "engineering mechanics" requirement?

    RESPONSE:  The inclusion of "apply concepts and principles of … engineering mechanics … to solve civil engineering problems" is intended to ensure that concepts and principles of mechanics and their application in civil engineering are addressed in the curriculum.  It is not required that a particular set of courses in engineering mechanics (e.g., statics, dynamics, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, soil mechanics, structural mechanics) be included in the curriculum. Programs can decide which components of engineering mechanics they want to emphasize in their curriculum and how to cover these components in their curriculum.  Some programs may choose to have separate courses for some components (or combined components), while covering certain concepts and principles of engineering mechanics through incorporation in one or more courses with different foci (e.g., project and design courses).  Programs have flexibility in deciding which concepts and principles of engineering mechanics to address in their curriculum.  A final note:  this is only a requirement for the inclusion of engineering mechanics in the curriculum; there is no requirement for a program to assess students' ability to apply engineering mechanics concepts.



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-28-2021 11:21 PM
    A few questions about numerical methods since it was not part of my curriculum almost 20 years ago and I am not familiar with it:

    1. For which civil engineering course(s) does the task committee foresee numerical methods being needed as prior knowledge for?
    2. Where does the task committee recommend numerical methods be introduced in the curriculum; in a mathematics course or embedded in civil engineering courses?
    3. Does the task committee foresee numerical methods becoming a topic on the NCEES Fundamentals of Engineering Exam?
    4. What application does it have in practical civil engineering applications other than in powering FEA software?


    ------------------------------
    David Fedor P.E., M.S.
    Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Technology
    Pennsylvania College of Technology
    Williamsport, PA
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 08:52 AM
    Thank you, Mr. Fedor, for your comments on the proposed addition of "apply concepts and principles of .... numerical methods".  As discussed in FAQs 5 and 6 that I have posted on this topic, the CEPC Task Committee discussed at length the CEBOK3 recommended inclusion of numerical methods.  We acknowledge the importance of students acquiring a working knowledge of some basic concepts of numerical methods, for understanding the methods employed in design and analysis software widely used in modern civil engineering practice.  The CEPC Task Committee concluded that there already is some level of exposure to numerical methods in CE-accredited programs through current curricular requirements such as differential equations (e.g., Euler's method and other numerical techniques for equation solving).  Exposure to numerical methods in mathematics courses can help with understanding of numerical approaches in upper-level courses in structural engineering, geotechnical engineering (e.g., slope stability analysis), hydraulic engineering (e.g., Hardy-Cross method), etc.   The CEPC Task Committee will certainly consider your questions and perspectives on numerical methods along with other input that we anticipate receiving on this topic.

    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 12:33 PM
    Thank you for the insight. As I autodidactically learn about numerical methods, it does seem like an important topic for civil engineers to at least have exposure to.

    The first concern I have is, like with all math in engineering, is giving too much control of the teaching to mathematicians. From experience in the workforce, workforce civil engineers do not used math like it is taught in undergraduate mathematics courses. I encourage the task committee to read and reflect on this Higher Education article from several years ago: Just how much math, and what kind, is enough for life sciences majors?. While it focuses on a turf war between biology and mathematics departments, I think it is still relevant to the typical landscape in engineering education, at least how I experienced it. I agree there should be flexibility for civil engineering programs to incorporate numerical methods according to their own needs. I personally do not favor a complete math course on numerical methods taught by mathematicians. I think it would be best taught in chunks in the context of the civil engineering problems it is being applied to.

    My second concern is the extent to which most workforce civil engineers will use numerical methods, or need to have more than a introductory understanding of it. When I posited my questions, I did anticipate that structures, geotech, and hydro would be the disciplines where numerical methods are applicable, and at the upper level. I agree if there isn't some understanding when using software driven by numerical methods, an engineer runs the risk of garbage in = garbage out. It's only my perspective, but from my experience at the DOTs, the tools that are founded on numerical methods are only used on projects where traditional methods are questionable. For example, PennDOT's CSVT project. That project took 50 years of planning and development to become a reality. Sub-consultants with very specialized experience in structures and hydro used advanced tools that might employ numerical methods for some analysis of that project, but in the overall scope of that project, that was a very small part of the engineering involved. That type of large scale new construction project is an outlier. Most projects in the DOT focus on rehabilitation and reconstruction of existing infrastructure and the civil engineers employ traditional methods and software for these projects.

    I understand that if there is a gap in the criteria, that it has to be addressed. I am concerned that students that aren't interested in a structures, geotech, or hydro track will find numerical methods a challenge that harms their engineering self-efficacy more than it helps provide them practically usable knowledge. My hope is that programs find a way to integrate numerical methods into civil engineering courses rather than use a mathematics course to satisfy the criteria.

    Personally relative to FEA software, I think the 21st civil engineer needs more instruction on how to identify inputs through research and laboratory testing and how to evaluate output for magnitude and validity.

    Again, all opinions based on perspective, but I feel compelled to share in the interest of students and the workforce.

    ------------------------------
    David Fedor P.E., M.S.
    Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering Technology
    Pennsylvania College of Technology
    Williamsport, PA
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 02:20 PM
    I fully share your concerns, David, as someone who did have a full 4-credit course (85 hours direct teaching) of "Numerical Calculus" in their UG curriculum, taught my mathematicians.... Cholesky decompositions, well-conditioned matrices, etc... The only thing that we thought was useful out of the whole class, was interpolation and curve fitting. But of course, what Engineers need is the conceptual basis to decide when to interpolate vs. fitting, or what specific method to use, NOT all the mathematical details of how a cubic spline actually works or is obtained! That is the starting point to grow their judgment. All engineering courses where interpolation and curve fitting are used should discuss these issues, so that we don't end up in the current status-quo, which is basically that the only thing that graduates (and most practicing engineers) try are the different "trendlines" (what a terrible word) offered in Excel!

    It is true that there is a lot of numerical analysis in the software used for structural analysis, hydraulics, hydrology, etc., but it is much more important for engineers to understand what those models do (or don't do, or can't do) with regards to structural analysis, hydraulics, or hydrology (the physics that they are able to represent, their assumptions, their reliability, the fact that they are overparameterized, the situations in which the models will not work correctly, etc.), than it is to teach them the numerical methods that are internally used by the model to solve the variability in space and time!

    For example, in my field (water resources engineering), I need my graduates to fully understand that it is a vastly different thing to run a hydraulic profile in HEC-RAS 1-D (which basically solves physical concepts: conservation of matter -continuity, conservation of energy, conservation of linear momentum, with a single "clown-pocket type" parameter, Manning's n - most of the uncertainty is in the value of this parameter), than it is to use an over-parameterized rainfall-runoff model based on the Curve Number method (based on an assumption, on data that nobody knows, and on a 24-hr framework for converting total precip to total runoff - something that obviously cannot work for 15 min to a few hours hydrologic responses in urban areas where everybody applies it nowadays) and unit hydrographs (a convenient engineering concept, based on more assumptions, which works OK in some basins, but not so well in others). In other words, the real physical ("truth") content in each of these two softwares, as well as the number of unknown parameters, accuracy, etc., is vastly different: a calibrated HEC-RAS model will most probably give very reliable results (unless the range of the modelled flows is too different than the flood used for calibration), while a calibrated rainfall-runoff model probably will not even be representing the correct physical mechanisms that are actually happening in the watershed (e.g., will assume that all runoff is produced as surface, Hortonian flow, while most of the catchment actually responds sub-surficially).

    Thanks for these gratifying exchanges.
    Claudio

    ------------------------------
    Claudio Meier Ph.D., Ing., M.ASCE
    Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
    University of Memphis
    Memphis TN
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 08:33 AM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 5:  Why was "numerical methods" added?

    RESPONSE:  The CEBOK3 added "numerical methods" as part of the "foundational outcome" of mathematics.  The EAC general criteria and current Civil Engineering Program Criteria include the topics of calculus, differential equations, and probability and statistics.  Thus, with respect to the recommendation of CEBOK3, numerical methods is a missing foundational topic in mathematics relevant to Civil Engineering.

     

    The CEBOK3 describes numerical methods as "an area of mathematics and computer science focused on the development and use of algorithms for obtaining approximate solutions to complex mathematical problems."  Further, the CEBOK3 notes that "numerical methods are integral to modern mathematical, science, and engineering software" and that "for civil engineers to responsibly and effectively use analysis and design software, they should first have a deep working knowledge of numerical methods." 

     

    The CEPC Task Committee discussed the CEBOK3 recommendation at length.  The CEPC Task Committee acknowledges that civil engineers use "analysis and design software" to solve complex problems, and that a working knowledge of numerical methods can be necessary to understand and analyze the results obtained by some types of software, such as software that employing finite element methods.  From discussion the CEPC Task Committee concluded that most students are gaining some exposure to numerical methods through currently required mathematics (e.g., differential equations) and engineering (e.g., mechanics) courses, but it is important for programs to be intentional about where such exposure is provided and opportunity for acquisition of working knowledge is obtained.



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 29 days ago
    Thank you for your response to FAQ5. After discussing this change with my Department's faculty, we recommend that it be accompanied by *or linked to) definitions and examples of applying "Numerical methods" and solving "Complex problems." We feel these terms can be interpreted in a variety of ways for each Civil Engineering specialization and can cause confusion. The inclusion of numerical methods might require modification of our curriculum, for your information.


    Ryan

    Ryan N. Fries, Ph.D., P.E. (he/his)
    Professor and Chair
    Department of Civil Engineering
    Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
    618-650-5026
    [email protected]

    ------------------------------
    Ryan Fries Ph.D., P.E.
    Professor
    Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
    Southern Illinois University IL
    ------------------------------



  • 13.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 28 days ago
    Professor Fries, we appreciate the thoughtful discussion that you have been having with your faculty about the proposed criteria, and in particular the proposed addition of "apply concepts and principles of .... numerical methods ...".  There was good discussion at the June 24 session of the ASCE National Civil Engineering Department Heads Conference on the proposed criteria, including the addition of "numerical methods", and others made suggestions similar to those from you and your colleagues, i.e., provide a definition and examples of what is meant.  If the addition of "numerical methods" is retained in the proposed CE program criteria, providing such explanations would take place in the Commentary.  At the NCEDHC it was noted that inclusion of a topic in the CE program criteria just means that a topic is included somewhere in the curriculum, which could be in a calculus course (e.g., numerical methods for solving differential equations) or in a fluid mechanics course (e.g., pipe network analysis) or any other course.  Others expressed that with such a "low bar" definition, why add something to the criteria that has been in all engineering curricula for a long time.  This prompted a comment that if "numerical methods" is to be added, the topic should be seriously engaged and the definition should reflect that.  The Task Committee will be carefully considering the important perspectives that you and others have raised on this topic.  Thanks for taking the time to consider and comment on the proposed criteria.

    Dave Dzombak

    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 14.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 08:36 AM

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTION 6:  How can a program implement the "numerical methods" requirement?

     

    RESPONSE:  The inclusion of "apply concepts and principles of … numerical methods … to solve civil engineering problems" is intended to ensure that concepts and principles of numerical methods and their application in civil engineering are addressed in the curriculum.  It is not required that a separate course in numerical methods be included in the curriculum. Programs can decide which components of numerical methods they want to emphasize in their curriculum and how to cover these components in their curriculum.  A final note:  this is only a requirement for the inclusion of numerical in the curriculum; there is no requirement for a program to assess students' ability to apply numerical methods concepts.



    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 15.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 05-29-2021 01:42 PM
    1. "To solve civil engineering problems" is intended to ensure that concepts and principles for each technical subject, e.g.,  engineering, science and their application in civil engineering, are addressed in the curriculum. The measure of this objective being met continuously is best measured in the area of application. . .after graduation!

    While one may argue the next point is "Understood," I wish to magnify it to attract dialogue from faculty and  practicing engineers, who know. . . factually . . their student's ability to communicate and/or  their firm's actual project-by-project outcomes in at least two areas:

    1. Client Delight . . . "Satisfaction" simply means they may not litigate.
    2. Financial performance comparing actual end-of-project profit vs. what was originally bid.
    • Basic Foundational Assumption:

    Students who are graduated from CE Programs have mastered the art and science of understanding and solving required CE course subject matter.

    That then leaves the proverbial "Proof of the Pudding" to be collectively agreed to by the ABET/CE Program Criteria Board/Committee.

    My uncharacteristic short input on how the above two results will actually be realized consistently is suggested by the Peirce quote and is found within the S.I. Hayakawa book

    1. "When assessing the truth or falsehood of an idea Peirce held that what matters most are the consequences that follow from the idea, rather than the idea itself." -Charles S. Peirce
    2. "Language in Thought & Action," by S.I. Hayakawa

    Stay Healthy!

    Cheers,

    Bill

     



    ------------------------------
    William M. Hayden Jr., Ph.D., P.E., CMQ/OE, F.ASCE
    Buffalo, N.Y.

    "It is never too late to be what you might have been." -- George Eliot 1819 - 1880
    ------------------------------



  • 16.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-03-2021 03:30 PM
      |   view attached
    First, please read the attached notes regarding arguments for the
    updating and serious revision to university CE program curriculum for the 21st Century forward.

    • To be clear, I posted this without any contact whatsoever with its author.

    Then please engage Dr. Walesh in this conversation.

    Respectfully Submitted,

    Bill

    ------------------------------
    William M. Hayden Jr., Ph.D., P.E., CMQ/OE, F.ASCE
    Buffalo, N.Y.

    "It is never too late to be what you might have been." -- George Eliot 1819 - 1880
    ------------------------------

    Attachment(s)



  • 17.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-06-2021 07:00 PM
    My feeling is that "Material Science" is a wide area for Civil Engineers, and may be beyond their scope of study, however Civil Engineers can use and apply new and appropriate materials to solve engineering problems.  So my suggestion to be  " apply engineering mechanism, use appropriate materials, and numerical methods to solve civil engineering problems;"

    ------------------------------
    Shehab Mourad
    Riyadh
    ------------------------------



  • 18.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-08-2021 08:11 PM
    Dear Shehab:  Thank you for contributing to the forum.
    Here are couple of thoughts regarding your suggestions.

    • "apply engineering mechanismcs, use appropriate materials, and xxx numerical methods to solve civil engineering problems;"

    note the apply is level III in Bloom's taxonomy that is used in the criteria and it is intentional in the original language.
    use is not definitive, and xxx is missing.  In the original phase, apply is the verb associated with the three areas.

    Agreed, material science is  broad, however intentionally.  Civil engineering spans so many subdisciplinary areas where new/novel materials are involving in many areas.  It would be difficult to be very prescriptive, and limiting, therefore a general approach is used.

    Note to commentary -- this could be material to expand upon therein.

    ------------------------------
    Jay Puckett P.E., F.ASCE
    Director
    University of Nebraska
    Omaha NE
    ------------------------------



  • 19.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-13-2021 11:57 PM
    How narrowly would one define "to solve civil engineering problems"?

    Some engineering schools have cross-departmental statics, dynamics, strength of materials, fluid mechanics and/or numerical methods classes that are offered for, e.g., civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering students combined (this may particularly be the case at smaller schools).  Clearly, these are not the only courses in the curriculum in which one must apply the relevant material, but the primary performance indicators would likely be in these courses that necessarily have application not only to civil engineering applications but to mechanical, aerospace, etc.

    Other engineering schools may have standalone courses in civil engineering but allow students, if needed, to take the parallel course from another (e.g., mechanical engineering) department.  In such cases, the performance indicators with respect to "solve civil engineering problems" would likely be primarily assessed in the civil engineering versions of these courses and not in the others.  However, the students who take, e.g., the mechanical engineering statics course are learning nearly identical material.

    ------------------------------
    Erik Johnson Ph.D., M.ASCE
    Professor & Vice Dean
    Univ of Southern California
    Los Angeles CA
    ------------------------------



  • 20.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-14-2021 09:52 AM
    Dear Professor Johnson:

    You raise a good point about the potential for a program or program evaluator to take too narrow a view of "to solve civil engineering problems."  A case can certainly be made that cross-department courses on basic topics such as statics, dynamics, strength of materials, fluid mechanics, and numerical methods satisfy the intent of the program criterion.  Most projects span multiple engineering disciplines, and many engineering application examples brought forth in such courses - including those connected to aerospace, manufacturing, etc - can be shown to relate to civil engineering.  The point that you raise will be considered by the CEPC Task Committee and by the sub-group considering changes to the Commentary document.  I should note that the CEPC Task Committee is very supportive of maintaining flexibility and encouraging programs to innovate, and we are approaching our work with this principle firmly in mind.

    Dave Dzombak

    ------------------------------
    David Dzombak, PhD, PE, Dist.M.ASCE
    Hamerschlag University Professor and Dept Head
    Dept of Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Carnegie Mellon University
    Pittsburgh, PA 15213
    [email protected]
    ------------------------------



  • 21.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-14-2021 10:09 AM
    Professor Johnson,

    I agree with Professor Dzombak's response and would just like to add one point.  You've made several references to "performance indicators"--which are typically used for assessing student outcomes.  But Program Criteria are only allowed to specify curriculum topics and faculty qualifications.  The ABET EAC specifically forbids Program Criteria from specifying outcomes.  Thus, this criteria provision should be interpreted to mean that, somewhere in the curriculum, there must be opportunities for students to apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and numerical methods to solve CE problems.  These is no requirement to assess or measure students' performance in these areas--hence, no requirement for performance indicators.

    ------------------------------
    Stephen Ressler Ph.D., P.E., Dist.M.ASCE
    Professor Emeritus
    Bethlehem PA
    ------------------------------



  • 22.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-14-2021 02:55 PM
    Thank you both for your quick responses!

    Dear Prof. Dzomback: Thank you for noting the need for some flexibility in how the program is designed.

    Prof. Ressler, Thank you for reminding that the Program Criteria are not student outcomes that must be specifically assessed.

    Best regards,

    Erik

    ------------------------------
    Erik Johnson Ph.D., M.ASCE
    Professor
    Univ of Southern California
    Los Angeles CA
    ------------------------------



  • 23.  RE: _6. ...apply engineering mechanics, materials science, and ...

    Posted 06-24-2021 12:49 PM
    I agree with the sentiment expressed at the ASCE Department Chair's meeting that the use of the specific term "materials science" is problematic. I strongly encourage use of a more disciplinary relevant term such as "materials for civil engineering" or "civil engineering materials," or something similar, in lieu of "materials science."

    ------------------------------
    Christopher Cappa
    Davis CA
    ------------------------------